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Last week I enjoyed a wonderful UWS/Kelvin College production of Cats at the Scottish Youth Theatre in Glasgow.

I am delighted to pass on  this message  from my Musical Theatre Colleagues, Stephen Langston & Jane Robertson.

“You were probably aware of the sell out performances of Cats the musical by our 3rd and 4th year degree students in collaboration with Glasgow Kelvin College last week at the Scottish Youth Theatre. Such a shame if you missed it as it really was one of the most professional pieces of musical theatre we have ever produced. You can see a few photographs here

https://www.facebook.com/stephen.langston/media_set?set=a.10151978965853366.1073741825.527583365&type=3

However, you’re in luck, because the same classes have also been preparing and rehearsing the Broadway and West End smash hit Avenue Q at the same time, and now we have triple the amount of seats in the theatre so you can all come and see it.

AVENUE Q is the story of Princeton, a bright-eyed college grad who comes to New York City with big dreams and a tiny bank account. He soon discovers that the only neighborhood in his price range is Avenue Q; still, the neighbors seem nice. There’s Brian the out-of-work comedian and his therapist fiancee Christmas Eve; Nicky the good-hearted slacker and his roommate Rod—a Republican investment banker who seems to have some sort of secret; an Internet addict called Trekkie Monster; and a very cute kindergarten teaching assistant named Kate. And would you believe the building’s superintendent is Gary Coleman?!? (Yes, that Gary Coleman.) Together, Princeton and his newfound friends struggle to find jobs, dates, and their ever-elusive purpose in life.

Avenue Q’s cast is a bit unusual. If you have not seen or heard of it before then you are in for a real treat. It is made up of Sesame Street style puppets (ours being the original West End and Broadway puppets). However, do not be fooled, these are not the safe, child like puppets we all know and love, they come with an age warning. A lot of their discussion, songs, monologues and action is based on adult themes. This show is not suitable for children as it contains adult material, however, it is one of the funniest shows I have seen on and off of the West End. If you want a really good night out then come along and see this. Its something you will never forget, and remember to leave the kids at home, no matter how tempted you are by the beautiful puppets.

All UWS, relatives and friends can buy tickets at the box office for the Gaiety Theatre, Ayr, for the concession price. Simply phone the box office, say you are UWS staff and pay for the tickets over the phone. You will be expected to produce your UWS badge when picking up the tickets on the night.

This show really is worth coming along to see, with a full size avenue Q set, the West End Puppets, a live band and the most wonderful cast of professional musical theatre students we have had. Hope to see you there. Ticket details enclosed, and now go visit this link which explains a wee bit about the show – Don’t be offended, it’s just theatre.

More info on Avenue Q at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azsg4hwpWt4

Best wishes

Stephen Langston   and Jane Robertson. ”

Book Early, Book Often.


StudioLab is a unique crossover project which allows University Of The West Of Scotland  students from across  all programmes in the School Of Creative & Cultural Industries  to collaborate together to create a live recorded TV Programme.

Over the past  7 weeks, as part of their CSA Research Project, 4th Year Contemporary Screen Acting Students have been tasked with creating a 30-45 minute piece of TV Drama. They are devising , workshopping ,  and will finally  record this programme  live on Weds 11th December.

To do this requires the support and help of students from other programmes to chronicle and record the work. We will be continuing with StudioLab next Trimester at UWS so  if you are a student in the UWS School Of Creative & Cultural Industries and are Image interested in taking part as a Designer, Producer, Director, Runner, Camera Operator, Musician, Digital Artist, Screenwriter or whatever your chosen specialism may be, please come along to our first meeting.

Every Weds, 1.30 PM TV Studio 1, UWS Ayr.

Please email me at StudioLab@uws.ac.uk to book a place.


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BAFTA MASTERCLASS: LET ME ENTERTAIN YOU     

THURSDAY 18 APRIL

CCA, 6.30PM

Tickets £5 from CCA Box Office

 

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Do you want to work in TV entertainment?  Are you interested in hearing how some of the biggest hits in UK television were devised?  Get the inside track on how to create and produce award winning TV entertainment with a panel made up of the cream of British television production – Andrew Newman, David Flynn and Karen Smith.

 

Andrew Newman started as a runner on The Big Breakfast before going on to produce The Word and Brass Eye.  In 1998 he became Entertainment Commissioner at Channel 4, overseeing shows like TFI Friday and Da Ali G Show. After a stint at Five, he returned to C4 as Head of Comedy & Entertainment, commissioning 8/10 CatsPeep Show and The Inbetweeners. He joined Objective Productions in 2009 and became Chief Executive in 2011.

David Flynn became joint Managing Director of Remarkable Television in September 2009, after taking over Brighter Pictures in 2007. Most recently, David created and executive produced hit game show The Million Pound Drop Live (Channel 4), and was involved in the show’s international roll out. He also co-created and executive produced daytime hit Pointless (BBC Two), Seven Days On the Breadline (ITV1) and Divided (ITV1).

Karen Smith started as a Day Producer on This Morning, going on to become Editor.  She then joined Endemol, helping to launchComic Relief Does Fame Academy (BBC 1).  In 2004, she joined BBC Entertainment and was the Co-Devisor and Executive Producer of Strictly Come Dancing, one of the biggest entertainment formats in the world.  In 2009, Karen joined Shine and became Joint Managing Director, before starting Tuesday’s Child in 2012.

BAFTA Scotland

249 West George Street, Glasgow G2 4QE

T +44 (0)141 302 1770

F +44 (0)141 302 1771

www.bafta.org/scotland


This video was created by University Of The West Of Scotland students to publicise and market their Contemporary Screen Acting Degree.

If you have a Higher National Diploma or equivalent in a Performance -based subject, then this two year top up Degree Programme is designed for you.

Contemporary Screen Acting At UWS


 

PRESTIGIOUS DRAMA UK RECOGNITION FOR THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMMES

·         University of the West of Scotland – BA (Hons) Contemporary Screen Acting

·         University of the West of Scotland – BA (Hons) Musical Theatre

·         University of the West of Scotland – BA (Hons) Performance

Three University of the West of Scotland (UWS) degree programmes are among the first in the UK to achieve Drama UK Recognition – a New Level of Quality Assurance for Drama Training Providers.

Drama UK, the organisation which champions quality drama training in the UK, has awarded the first of its brand new quality marks to three courses at UWS – BA (Hons) Contemporary Screen Acting, BA (Hons) Musical Theatre, and BA (Hons) Performance.

The new quality mark entitled ‘Recognition’ offers students and their future employers assurance that a course with this award has been through a rigorous assessment including a visit from a panel of industry experts to ensure that it delivers what it promises and provides a real benefit to the industry.

Ian Kellgren, Chief Executive of Drama UK, said: “We are delighted to award the first of our Recognition marks. We have piloted this new level of quality assurance thanks to support from Creative Skillset.”

Historically, industry accredited quality assurance has only been available to vocational courses at conservatoire drama schools. The development of this new quality mark is part of Drama UK’s mission to broaden the reach of its quality assurance in the sector.

Kellgren added: “The drama training landscape has changed significantly since quality assurance for drama training was originally set up by The National Council of Drama Training (NCDT) in the 1970s. We have acknowledged that there are now many more providers in this sector and there is a need to provide quality assurance for courses that are less vocational than conservatoire training but offer a very real benefit to the industry.”

Drama UK took on the Quality Assurance role from National Council for Drama Training (NCDT) when it merged with the Conference of Drama Schools in June, and continues to champion quality drama training in the UK through advocacy, advice and assurance.

Jane Robertson, UWS Senior Lecturer and Performance Area Subject Leader said “We are delighted that all three UWS performance related degree programmes are among the first in the UK to be granted Drama UK Recognition, a quality assurance mark that UWS staff and students are very proud of.”

A new Drama UK website, www.dramauk.co.uk, is due to launch later this year and will contain the full list of all Accredited and Recognised courses as well as other vocational training available. There will also be information and advice for students looking for drama and technical theatre training.

Notes:

UWS School of Creative and Cultural Industries – a Skillset Media Academy www.uws.ac.uk/cci provides industry-ready degree programmes, designed by staff with wide-ranging experience in broadcasting, film, journalism, music, performance and the visual arts. It strives to produce graduates who will be able to compete successfully in their chosen sectors, set up their own production company/creative business, and demonstrate a critically aware, theoretically informed view of their discipline. The School leads UWS’ Skillset Media Academy – one of only three Skillset Academies in Scotland – an industry-accredited network of excellence.

 

Drama UK provides a unique link between the theatre, media and broadcast industries and drama training providers in the UK. It gives a united, public voice to this sector; offers help and advice to drama students of all ages; and awards a quality kite mark to the very best drama training in the UK.

Creative Skillset (www.creativeskillset.org) is the Creative Industries’ Sector Skills Council (SSC) which comprises TV, film, radio, interactive media, animation, computer games, facilities, photo imaging, publishing, advertising and fashion and textiles. Its aim is to support the productivity of our industry to ensure that it remains globally competitive. It does this by influencing and leading; developing skills, training and education policy; and through opening up the industries to the UK’s pool of diverse talent.

Congratulations to all staff and students involved in the bidding and evaluation process!


I have taught Screenwriting and Performance at the University Of The West of Scotland since 2006.  Dr Sarah Neely, who at that time was teaching Screenwriting  here,  originally asked me to visit   to deliver a one hour talk on my work in the Creative Industries. At that time the institution was called “The University Of Paisley” .  I thought I was agreeing to go and talk in Paisley, Renfrewshire,  until the day before the visit  I  looked at a map armed with the Post Code and realised that I was booked to speak in Ayr. Ayr???  What….Ayr, Ayrshire? Robert Burns? Ice Cream? Butlins? I remember phoning Sarah up the night before and asking her once again…”

“It is Ayr you want me to go to, is it? ”

She assured me that it was indeed the toon of honest men and bonnie lasses,  and off I went with my bike on the train, to Ayr the next day. I got out at the end of the line, and outside the station, asked the ticket inspector  if he could tell me the way to the University. “Oh aye, ” he said, ” Ayr College….doon there, mate…”

“No..not Ayr College…..the University….” I said.

He drew himself up to his full 5’5″ , cupped his fag against the wind, and said ” There’s nae University in Ayr, son….”

Noting my puzzlement, one of his colleagues paused from rolling a cigarette and shouted over…” It’s Craigie he’s wantin’, Wullie”

With that, a light came on in Wullie’s eye…” Oh..CRAIGIE, is it?….how did you no say?” And with that he gave me pinpoint directions to the  Craigie Campus of the University Of Paisley.

6 years later and I am still here.

The New Campus

The New University Campus In Ayr

Now renamed University Of The West Of Scotland after its merger with Bell College Hamilton, and newly relocated in our new £80 million state of the art campus on the banks of the River Ayr, the place I work in  now is very different from the leaky, drafty, run down ex-teacher training college I walked into that day in March 2006. Thankfully, there is sign outside the town which says “Ayr..A University Town” , so that even Wullie from the station will now realise that there is a University in Ayr…and a damn fine one at that!

But there is something else that hasn’t changed at all. The students. Oh they aren’t exactly the same student’s of course. Six cohorts of graduates have moved on and made a life for themselves in the time I have been there. But they are exactly the same type of students.A large percentage of them tend to come from the same housing schemes, the same small towns, the same Islands  and urban conurbations as  they did then.

There is a specific “look”  and “sound” to a group of  UWS students.  I can’t define it, but I can instantly recognise it. I have lectured to MA students in  ancient oak and leather furnished rooms at St Andrews: to groups of  Film Students in  a modern Lecture Theatre at the University of Stirling: to  Theatre Studies Graduates in a beautifully dramatic arts “Church”  at Glasgow Uni. Every one of those groups   was instantly differentiated from my students at UWS.  Let’s cut to the chase here. We are talking class. The statisticians don’t talk about class. They talk about “areas of high deprivation” or “lower socioeconomic sectors”. Whatever way you dress it up as, the “look” and “sound” of a group of UWS students is closely linked to the fact that a large percentage of them come from the sort of places that most of the middle class worthies who run Scottish Education  only see through  smoke-tinted windscreens. Many of my students are the first person in their family to take up Higher Education. Many of them are single parents. Many of them have full time jobs in very low paid areas. Many of them subsist on bursaries, grants,handouts  and overdrafts.  Over 35% of our Performance Students have special educational needs which are fully supported by our fantastic team at UWS Ayr. I wonder what the equivalent  figure is in St. Andrews? I don’t have that figure to hand, but today, thanks to the NUS Scotland, I DO have a figure which has made me proud to work at UWS, and proud to teach my students. More of that later.

The New NSS Survey is out?  Oh……great.  :..(

Creative Hack Day in The Control Room

When you work at UWS, the release of National Statistics is rarely a pleasant experience. With teeth-grinding regularity, I see the National Student Survey  “Performance Charts” which put Oxford , St Andrews and Cambridge at the top, and UWS somewhere…well…. let’s say a wee bit further down than Edinburgh.

Never mind that my students are taught in the most modern Creative Industries University in Britain.Never mind that all the hard work, toil, time, effort and downright passion that  my colleagues and I put in to our students learning experience  comes to nothing. My UWS students aren’t even included in the National Student Survey. Astonishingly, unbelievably,  incredibly, as direct entry third year “top up” students, they don’t even get ASKED what they think of their education. Why? Because  the entire NSS system is geared to assessing the thoughts of  18 year olds with A Levels  who are  studying   three year degrees. None of my students, not a single ONE of them, adheres to that biased,  Southern, middle class model. Many of my students don’t even have Highers. They left school at 16, maybe took a year out to work , or signed on. Some of them have been Fire Officers, Estate Agents,full time mothers, even a magician! Whatever their past, at some point,at some time,  they  took an access course, went to a local FE college, and achieved an HNC or an HND in Performance and Acting. They did this  in circumstances which were a million miles away from the creme de la creme of the education world who are  recruited by the “elites” .   This large group of Articulation students is completely ignored by the NSS.  Institutions like UWS  takes  large numbers of  these  students .  We   cajole them,  teache them, argue with them,  are frustrated and infuriated by them, but  finally we arm them with an honours degree , self respect,  and a practical tool kit to go out into the world and make a career for themselves. And yet my colleagues, students and I  have to watch as their progress is completely marginalised as the NSS  statistics  “prove” how wonderful the “elite” universities are, and how low down we are .

League Table Shmeague Table.

As we all know, the  true situation at the chalk face is far more  complex than any crass league tables can ever reflect. For example,  I am bursting with pride at my two Honours students who achieved First Class degrees this year. They could walk into post-graduate studies of any elite institution in the country if they so wished. However I am just as proud of  my other students who have emerged  from challenging circumstances and learned advanced criticality, reflection and transferrable soft and hard skills which will help them gain employment or create their own jobs and careers. They want  to ensure that their children don’t get the same free meals that they did, and I am proud to be part of that process. Indeed I  am literally  part of that process, because I too was  the possessor of a dreaded free  “white dinner ticket” while at school. But none of this is reflected in the cursed tables I see published in the papers every year. And do you know what? I’m past caring…..well…until today……because…..we made it to the top of a table today, and suddenly , I think they are a GREAT idea….so….

Our HD Television Studio at UWS Ayr.

Hallelujah.

Hallelujah! Let joy be unconfined!  Let the church bells ring and let laughter and mirth spread through the land! At last, some statistics are published which finally reflect the pride I feel in my institution, and which justify the passion and energy which my colleagues and I  put into our work here. UWS has come out ON TOP in a statistical survey! I will repeat that.  University Of The West Of Scotland  has come out ON TOP! We are the  top recruiter of students scoring highest using  the criteria of  the Scottish Index Of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD)

According to a recent study commissioned by NUS Scotland,  UWS recruits a greater percentage of students from “deprived areas” than any other university in Scotland. Of course needless to say, this was not presented as a positive story. Did I pick up my Herald yesterday and luxuriate in the headline  trumpeting “UWS Triumphs In Campaign For Open Access” ? Errr….No. Instead these figures were described as  “Elite Universities Fail To Recruit Poorer Pupils.” ‘Twas ever thus.

Nevertheless, it IS a positive story for us at UWS! Last year we  recruited 1,117 students from the lowest SIMD sector. To give this a bit of context,  St Andrews, (which I believe is thought of as one of the elite ) , managed to  recruit……..wait for the drumroll……..a grand total of ….13.   Maybe we should call them the St. Andrews 13. Maybe they were all from the same Rugby League  team? Whoever they are, I really  do wish them well, because they must be 13 of the most outstanding students in the country. However  it  means that while 2.7% of St Andrews students might have got free school meals or had an unemployed parent, the UWS figure is 25.4%.

Not only that, but  the elite universities (what a wonderful term that is ) are actually recruiting less disadvantaged students  than they did 10 years ago. This means that these  august  educational institutions , whose senior common rooms no doubt glow with statisfaction at their domination of the NSS statistics, are getting  less and less  successful in helping the poorest attempt to break out of a cycle of deprivation and poverty than before.

The Blame Game? 

Let’s make one point crystal clear here. I don’t blame the elite unis for this. As Alistair Sim, director of Universities Scotland states in the Herald  of  June 4th 2012

“To deliver significant change in universities, you first need to tackle the root of the problem, which is the large gap in attainment according to deprivation in schools, as recent reports have confirmed,”

I’ll say!

Coupled with this, I also don’t blame the elite for wanting to recruit the best students. If I got the chance to recruit a fantastic actress who had gone to Swiss finishing school and had an International Baccalauréat ,  I would do it in a flash. But I live in the real world too. I am competing against other institutions which are deemed “elite” and superior to mine. I know that because I see it in the League Tables, so it must be true, musn’t it?

Prolier Than Thou?

Of course, The solution to these societal inequalities, as Alistair Sim points out,  lies  not in the University sector  at all. Universities are the symptom of the disease, not the cause.  It is  in the schools and pre-school system that this canker of inequality is nurtured.  The fact that elite schools dominate the intake  of elite universities  is clearly symptomatic of the effect of pouring massive subsidy and resources into the education of the 7% of British Children who attend  “independent” schools. Thus inequality is structurally inevitable if we are to continue to give parents the “freedom” to buy their children’s superior school education. Even the proposed imposition of quotas, through  which the Government plans to force Universities  to take more disadvantaged students (and which the “elite”  will inevitably rail against) , are  naught but a  tiny sticking plaster  on what is  a far , far   deeper  inequality wound in contemporary Scottish society.

The Way Forward.

If we Scots decide that we want to build a fairer society (and the evidence of election after election in Scotland is that we do ) ,  then the  only way to redress our  massive societal inequalities is through investment in education and training at the pre-school, school, FE and HE level. At UWS, we  can only do what we can do, and  I am proud to be part of an HE institution which is clearly and  demonstrably doing more to enable open  access to HE than any other University in Scotland.

Graduation Day At UWS Ayr

So let’s hear it for UWS, our students, and especially for Wullie the ticket inspector from Ayr whose town has a University which is top of the performance charts in at least one crucial area.

If you want more information on the sort of work our Articulation students do in Ayr, please have a look at the Video below. It was created, written, acted and edited by  my third years last term. These students came  straight from an HND at FE College, and have  no current voice in the National Student Survey. Let their words speak for themselves.  Contemporary Screen Acting At University Of The West Of Scotland.

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